Irish Doodle All You Need to Know [2021]: Health, History, Temperament

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When looking for a lively, intelligent, and family-friendly dog, the Irish Doodle will be the perfect dog for you. Additionally, this breed doesn’t shed much and will be a loyal member of the family. The next great thing about this dog is that it doesn’t bark excessively.

irish doodle

This is a cross between an Irish setter and a Poodle; they are active, friendly, and loyal. If you want to know more about this amazing breed, read on. Because in this article, I will tell you everything you need to know about the breed and answer the most frequently asked questions about this breed.

Irish doodle walking

What is Irish Doodle?

Don’t worry if you haven’t heard of Irish Doodle before. The breed was originated in the last 30 years. Not only that, they are not recognized by the American Kennel Club as a real breed. Irish Doodles also referred to as Irish Poo setter, Irish setter doodle, and setter doodle, are medium-sized crossbreeds of Poodle and Irish setter. They are very cute, light-hearted, and friendly.

This dog is ideal for those looking for a dog that does not shed much and is intelligent, friendly, and loyal. They rarely bark and can get along with children and other pets.

History of the Irish Doodle

This is one of the latest designer dog breeds. Just like most of these dogs, the Irish Doodle doesn’t have much history, or at least they don’t have a well-documented history. The Irish Doodle was perhaps first developed during the last 30 years; this Doodle hybrid is thought to originate in the United States.

Because of the difficulty in distinguishing between mutts and designer dogs, it’s impossible to establish the exact date and location of the breed’s origins. Breeders just did not consider documenting such information until lately. Despite the lack of data about the breed, the Irish Doodle has an exciting history through its parents.

It is uncertain when the first Irish Doodles arrived in the United States. They are becoming gradually popular due to their loving and easygoing personalities. As a hybrid or designer crossbreed, they are not technically a classified breed, just a mix (same as Cavoodles and other mixes). For this reason, they are not recognized by any kennel club. But, they are recognized as a breed by the International Designer Canine Registry.

Like many other mixes, the main purpose of the Irish Doodle is to be a companion dog. Many of them have found work as therapy dogs, although these are usually Mini Irish Doodles.

Irish Doodle Temperament

The Irish Doodle is a smart and family-friendly designer dog. Thanks to both parents’ dog breeds for being athletic. This breed can be trained with a little perseverance, and they learn very fast. In fact, they love spending time with their owners to learn something new. If you want to train your dog in obedience and manners, you can rest assured that they will learn and learn it well. Also, if you have kids, the good news is that this breed is good with kids.

Since they love to learn, Irish setter doodles require a lot of stimulation all through the day. While you are at work, don’t expect this breed to spend the entire day on the couch. You can provide toys to keep them occupied, but that won’t meet their training needs. They want to fit into a family no matter how many kids you may have.

In fact, the more active the family, the more the dog will thrive. Though you can keep Irish Doodles in a home with less activity, they will do well if involved in a more active family life.

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Being in a home with less activity can be disadvantageous. They start to act funny in a busy environment, like a party or dinner with many people in the house. While this breed makes an excellent companion dog, they do not do well when left alone for extended periods. Irish Doodles are more prone to separation anxiety than others and can become destructive or involved in other unwanted behaviors.

Irish Doodle Common health problems

Irish Doodles are healthy dogs and can live up to 15 years; this is quite a long time for their size. Though they are healthy breeds, just like most designer dogs, they don’t have any medical concerns like their parents. This breed is generally healthy, but there are some conditions that potential owners should be aware of before bringing a new puppy home. Such conditions include the following:

Hip Dysplasia: This condition happens when the hip’s ball and socket don’t fit or properly develop. It is more common in larger breeds. As a result, the hips grind rather than slide as they move. This condition can cause deterioration or complete loss of joint function.

Bloat: This happens when the dog’s stomach is filled with food, fluid, or gas, putting pressure on other organs. This can make it difficult for your dog to breathe. If you suspect your dog has bloat, get him to the vet without delay because the condition can get worse quickly. Feeding your dog a varied diet with small, frequent portions can help prevent this.

Von Willebrand’s Disease: a genetic bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency of the von Willebrand Factor. This is a sticky glycol-protein in the blood that is needed for blood clotting or platelet binding. If not treated, this condition can cause severe injury because the blood cannot clot. While some dogs may not show any symptoms, others may bleed spontaneously or have persistent bleeding after injuries.

Eye Disorders: Both breeds have a history of eye problems and disorders. Progressive retinal atrophy is the most common dog eye condition, which can lead to blindness. Reputable breeders will have their purebred parents tested for any health problems, including eye disorders.

Irish Doodle Life expectancy

When it comes to the dog’s life expectancy, many factors can significantly reduce their lifespan. Factors include inappropriate diet, poor living conditions, lack of veterinary care, and other negative conditions. On the other hand, excellent medical care, an ideal living environment, and superior nutrition can make a dog live well beyond the expected lifespan. Hybrids, crossbreeds, and mixes are known to live longer than pure breeds. Irish Doodles have a life expectancy of 12 to 15 years when properly cared for, which is excellent for a medium-sized dog.

Coat and color

Irish Doodles coats are smooth, thick, and wavy. More relaxed than Poodle coats and fuller than Irish setter coats. Some coats will be more curly than others, but they will grow to be shaggy and long if not trimmed. Most Irish Doodles are created by crossing an Irish setter with a red Standard Poodle. The result is red hair. The shades range from a golden light red to deeper mahogany. White spots are common and generally appear on the chest and face.

Though, other colors are possible depending on the color of the Poodle breed and the generation of the puppies. Colors like black and apricot are very common. In contrast, other popular Poodle colors like brown, silver, cream, and blue occasionally appear, especially in the F1b and later generations. Partial colored dogs, particularly combinations of white and red, also appear in this mixed breed.

Irish doodle sitting

Irish Doodle Size and Weight

The two most common sizes are the Standard and Miniature Irish Doodle. However, some breeders refer to them as the Mini and the Medium. The male Standard Irish Doodles are bigger, weighing about 50 and 70 pounds and standing 24 and 28 inches tall. While the female Standard Irish doodles are slightly smaller, weighing 40 to 60 pounds and standing 22 to 26 inches tall.

Mini Irish Doodles are a tiny version of the original Irish Doodles. Half of their DNA comes from a Miniature Poodle, not a Standard Poodle. Mini Irish Doodles stand 12 to 17 inches tall and weigh 25 to 35 pounds on average. They resemble golden Doodle except for their dark apricot coat and slim build similar to that of their mother, the Irish setter.

Feeding

Irish Doodles need high-quality food to sustain their busy lifestyle and keep them healthy as they grow older. Both dry and wet food is appropriate, as well as a mixture of the two. If possible, choose dog food made of whole, natural ingredients and is devoid of by-products. Once high-quality dog food has been purchased, it’s a wise idea to stick with it to reduce the danger of digestive distress.

The nutritional requirements for standard Irish Doodles and Mini Irish Doodles differ. Mini Irish Doodles should be fed a small breed food, while standard Irish Doodles should be fed a large breed dog food. Buy high-quality food, and don’t forget that your dog’s activity level, metabolism, age, and other factors will influence the amount of food they need.

Even though Irish Doodles are always active doesn’t mean they should be given constant food all day long. As they get older and their activity levels decrease, an open feeding schedule could cause obesity and other health problems that come with it. An adult Irish Doodle should be given anywhere between 2 and 3 cups of dry food daily, depending on their activity level.

Grooming

When it comes to grooming requirements, Irish Doodles range from moderate to high maintenance. Their coat sheds very little, if at all. They can have either curly or wavy coats, with curly coats shedding the least. Because they don’t shed, their coat can easily get tangled or matted if not brushed regularly.

They usually have a wavy coat that can grow longer. It is up to the owner to determine how they should be groomed. If the hair is left long, it should be brushed every day to avoid matting. But keeping it short and brushing it like 2 to 3 times a week will maintain its perfect look. Sometimes their hair needs to be trimmed if they become too long. For example, if ear hairs grow too long, dirt can accumulate and cause an ear infection.

Brush your dog’s teeth a several times a week to help prevent dental disease and if their nails become too long. They should be trimmed to avoid causing your dog pain.

Exercise

Irish Doodles were initially bred as hunting dogs. For this reason, they will do well with agility and tracking. They enjoy a lot of daily exercise because of their high level of energy. And will easily get bored if left indoors for too long, they enjoy an hour-long walk or even run. Dog parks and visits to doggy daycare will be great fun since they are social and active dogs.

On the other hand, they can adjust to their owner’s schedules and get a moderate amount of exercise. They can even adjust to apartment living with a daily walk, jog, or game of fetch. For additional activity, you can also find time to play with your dog indoors or outdoors. Make sure you provide enough toys in the house for your dog to play with when they need to burn off some energy.

irish doodle playing

Irish Doodles Price

Irish Doodles are one of the rarest designer breeds, so they are not cheap to get and Irish Doodle puppy price depends on the color of the puppies, where and how the puppies are bred, how well they are cared for. Lineage papers, vaccinations, and accessories are also taken into consideration when pricing Irish Doodle puppies.

So, a new Irish Doodle puppy could cost around $1,500 to $5,000 or more. Lower-quality breeders may charge less than others, but this could indicate a lower level of care, leading to health problems in the future. Just because a breeder’s pricing is higher than others does not always mean higher quality.

For this reason, when adopting a new puppy, it is important to take the time to visit the facilities on your own if possible. And carefully examine the dog health and pedigree documents before making any commitments. Always get a health certificate for both dogs’ parents. As well as knowing the puppies breeding conditions.

Irish Doodles and Children

If you look for a great family pet, Irish Doodle is a good choice. Irish Doodles are very good with children, cute, soft, playful, and loving. They can be great playmates and a kid’s closest friends. They adapt well to family life and have a reputation for being great with children, displaying childlike enthusiasm while remaining patient when necessary. However, we advise dog owners not to leave their dogs alone with children. This can prevent accidental injury to a child or dog.

Irish Doodles VS Goldendoodles

Irish Doodles and Goldendoodles are the two most common designer dogs on the market. Goldendoodle is a mixed breed of a Poodle and Golden Retriever. They are friendly, lively, and very intelligent, like the Irish Doodle. Goldendoodles are known for being gold, and Irish Doodles are known for being red. Depending on the color of the Poodle, Goldendoodles may come in golden, black, cream, or red color.

Goldendoodles are a little bigger than Irish Doodles, and they require more grooming. Depending on what they acquire from their Poodle parent, both dogs can be beneficial for allergies. The breeds are similar in general, apart from a few small differences. When choosing the right puppy, the best thing you can do is ask the breeder. They will be able to help you make the right choice.

Pros and cons of owning Irish Doodle

Pros

  • Intelligent: Irish Doodle gets their intelligence from their Poodle parent. The breed’s great intelligence makes it easy for them to understand commands
  • Hypoallergenic: Generally considered hypoallergenic or has little to moderate shedding. This makes a perfect dog for allergy sufferers.
  • Friendly: They are very pleasant and good with children. And can make a wonderful family dog.

Cons

  • Irish Doodles have a ton of energy and need to exercise daily
  • They can develop separation anxiety: They are companion dogs that don’t like to be alone for lengthy periods. If left alone, Irish Doodle may develop separation anxiety and become destructive.
  • They can be very expensive to buy than other dog breeds. This is mainly true for Mini Irish Doodles that are even more expensive.

Frequently Asked Questions

How much does an Irish Doodle cost?

Irish Doodles vary from breeder to breeder, depending on the size and color you choose. Irish Doodles with red coats are the most affordable, with prices starting at about $1400. A black and apricot Irish doodle can cost over $1,600. The higher the demand, the higher the price. The cost of an Irish Doodle puppy ranges from $1,400 to $5,000.

Do Irish Doodles shed?

Irish Doodles don’t shed much, but if their coat grows long, they will shed moderately. This is due to the Irish setter’s gene, as Irish Setters have long fur and shed moderately. But you can simply avoid this by brushing their coat regularly. Irish Doodles shed less than their Poodle-mixed relatives.

dog sitting

Are Irish Doodles hard to train?

These dogs are easy to train because of the Poodle bloodlines that make them very intelligent. They enjoy learning new things and are constantly eager to learn new things. Though they are easy to train, perseverance is the key. Like any other dog, persistent training help keep things fresh in their mind.

How fast do Irish Doodles grow?

Standard Irish Doodles will generally reach their maximum height in 12 months; they will continue to gain weight until 18 months old. The miniature sizes will grow more quickly, reaching an adult height in the first ten months and being completely grown by their first birthday or shortly after that.

Keep in mind that reaching physical adulthood does not always mean reaching mental maturity. Any breed can exhibit puppy behavior up to the age of two. Irish setters are known for exhibiting puppy qualities for up to four years. Therefore, your Irish Doodle’s may take after their setter parent, and the puppy antics may take a while.

What is a mini Irish Doodle?

This is a smaller version of the Irish Doodle. They often grow to be around 15 and 25 inches tall and weigh between 20 and 35 pounds. Mini Irish Doodles come in a smaller packet, but they are so expensive to maintain. They are a more expensive than the standard Irish Doodle. Because of their size, the Mini Irish Doodles are frequently used as emotional support or therapy dogs.

Do Irish Doodles have a double coat?

Looking at both parents, the Irish setter has a double coat, but Poodle has a single coat. Most Irish Doodles will have a single coat thick like a poodle but soft and wavy without tight curls. Their coats are normally dense, long with wavy curls. However, it varies from dog to dog and which parent they mostly resemble, a poodle or an Irish setter. The same may be said of their shedding.

This depends on the parent’s shedding trait that the puppy inherited. They usually end up having Poodle tighter coats and curls. But if they inherit more of their Irish setter traits, their coat and curlier hair will be softer.

Lastly, owning an Irish Doodle is a privilege because they are such a sweet breed that deserves only the best. They want to be part of the family and can adjust to practically any situation that can arise. The Irish Doodles are ideal for anyone who enjoy an active lifestyle and wants to spend time with a loving companion.

This breed can teach you a thing or two about keeping a positive attitude. Although a lot of love, attention, and training is required, you will certainly enjoy many benefits of sharing your home with this amazing creature.

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. Lauren

    WOW! This breed looks so cool and nice and I can’t wait to get one now! I’ve just recently learned this breed existed and now I am hooked on it! And then I also learned there’s the mini version as well which is so cute 🙂

    I know they are pretty expensive but I want to get one as soon as possible.

  2. Carter

    It’s a shame they can only live up to 15 years. I’ve had a dog that lived up to 21 years and he was amazing. It was hard losing him and now I think we’re ready to get a new friend around the house. We like the look of the Irish Doodle and actually the last picture in this article reminds us a bit of our former dog.

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